© Marc Labelle 2010-2016
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About Marc

No fuss, no tricks of the trade,

just writing

If you were expecting to read about how I received a couple degrees in Literature or English, I’m sorry to disappoint. I am simply a man who has stories to tell and seem to have a knack for the English language. My first urge to sit before a computer and type a few words came at the age of seventeen. The first scene of Knightfall came grudgingly slow, all for naught. It had been written on my dad’s computer and the floppy disc remained behind when I moved back with my mother. All I remember of that first attempt was that it was nothing like how the novel now starts. To tell you the truth, I had doubts about my talent at that time. That changed a year and a half later when I took that Grade 12 Creative Writing class. An above-average grade and praise from the teacher once a month or so really boosts a young author’s confidence. I also found out that year I might actually be able to sit down and accomplish the daunting task of getting a long story on paper. We were given an assignment that was to be at least 5000 words long. I topped 13000 and had to end the story too abruptly for my liking due to a fast approaching deadline. So why didn’t I go to university and get those degrees in Literature or English, you might ask? I just wanted to write, not spend all my time learning all the tedious rules. But most of all, I had a stronger penchant for numbers and computers. So my post-secondary education was wasted elsewhere. I say wasted because nothing came of it. But I’m sure you want to learn how my first novel came to be. In 2005, I left my menial job to become a stay-at-home dad. I also took the opportunity to get that story that had popped in my head when I was seventeen onto paper. Thirteen months later, the first draft of Knightfall was written. Now the hard part was to begin: the editing and the publishing. I tried the traditional route of getting an agent to find a publisher. A budding agency in New York did take me on, but when the year-long contract lapsed my manuscript was still in my hands instead of on the printing presses. So, in May of 2008, I decided to publish the book myself. All I wanted was to see my work in print, for my friends and family to have a physical copy of my work to enjoy as much as I did. I found a Print-On-Demand company online who would bind the book for me and those who came to me wanting a copy. A year later, I received an e-mail from that agency that had not been able to help previously. They made up for it by introducing me to Strategic Book Group (now Strategic Book Publishing & Rights Agency), even though they no longer had any obligations to me. They offered me a larger network of potential buyers and more services to make the book even better. I jumped at the chance. Those pesky errors I noticed after the first publication of Knightfall were corrected and a cover that was more to my liking was created. That story that entered my mind back in 1992 has finally come to fruition. So what does the future hold? Hopefully many more stories to entertain the masses.
Author of Knightfall

Quick Facts

Here are a few things that some might find interesting: Born on June 22, 1975 Lives in Sturgeon Falls, Ontario, Canada with his second wife and eldest daughter Has a brother and two half-sisters, all younger Has four children: 3 girls and 1 boy Needs music to write. Silence is too distracting. Preferred genres of music while writing: Heavy Metal or Hard Rock His eldest daughter began writing her first novel at the age of 12 Preferred genres of reading: Fantasy and Horror Favorite authors: Margaret Weis Tracy Hickman Stephen King Favorite novel: The Lord of the Rings
About Marc
© Marc Labelle 2010-2016
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About Marc

No fuss, no tricks of the trade,

just writing

If you were expecting to read about how I received a couple degrees in Literature or English, I’m sorry to disappoint. I am simply a man who has stories to tell and seem to have a knack for the English language. My first urge to sit before a computer and type a few words came at the age of seventeen. The first scene of Knightfall came grudgingly slow, all for naught. It had been written on my dad’s computer and the floppy disc remained behind when I moved back with my mother. All I remember of that first attempt was that it was nothing like how the novel now starts. To tell you the truth, I had doubts about my talent at that time. That changed a year and a half later when I took that Grade 12 Creative Writing class. An above-average grade and praise from the teacher once a month or so really boosts a young author’s confidence. I also found out that year I might actually be able to sit down and accomplish the daunting task of getting a long story on paper. We were given an assignment that was to be at least 5000 words long. I topped 13000 and had to end the story too abruptly for my liking due to a fast approaching deadline. So why didn’t I go to university and get those degrees in Literature or English, you might ask? I just wanted to write, not spend all my time learning all the tedious rules. But most of all, I had a stronger penchant for numbers and computers. So my post-secondary education was wasted elsewhere. I say wasted because nothing came of it. But I’m sure you want to learn how my first novel came to be. In 2005, I left my menial job to become a stay-at-home dad. I also took the opportunity to get that story that had popped in my head when I was seventeen onto paper. Thirteen months later, the first draft of Knightfall was written. Now the hard part was to begin: the editing and the publishing. I tried the traditional route of getting an agent to find a publisher. A budding agency in New York did take me on, but when the year- long contract lapsed my manuscript was still in my hands instead of on the printing presses. So, in May of 2008, I decided to publish the book myself. All I wanted was to see my work in print, for my friends and family to have a physical copy of my work to enjoy as much as I did. I found a Print-On- Demand company online who would bind the book for me and those who came to me wanting a copy. A year later, I received an e-mail from that agency that had not been able to help previously. They made up for it by introducing me to Strategic Book Group (now Strategic Book Publishing & Rights Agency), even though they no longer had any obligations to me. They offered me a larger network of potential buyers and more services to make the book even better. I jumped at the chance. Those pesky errors I noticed after the first publication of Knightfall were corrected and a cover that was more to my liking was created. That story that entered my mind back in 1992 has finally come to fruition. So what does the future hold? Hopefully many more stories to entertain the masses.